Music

J. Cole Has a Hidden Verse on Logic’s New ‘Everybody’ Album, And It’s Dope



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Logic has just dropped his new album, Everybody, which is full of commentary that touches on a wide range of issues—from race to suicide, to religion, to self-love and acceptance.

And while the album finds Logic at his most lyrically ambitious, supported by assists from Chuck D, Black Thought and Killer Mike, everybody is talking about the hidden verse from J. Cole.

Jermaine shows up on the album’s last track, “AfricAryaN,” which also features an appearance by Neil deGrasse Tyson. The track is just over 12 minutes long, and Logic talks about the complexities of being biracial, and the affects that it’s had on his self-perception and acceptance in both Black and white communities.

“I feel the Aryan in my blood, it’s scarier than a Blood/Been looking for holy water, now I’m praying for a flood/It feel like time passing me by slower than a slug/While this feeling inside of my body seep in like a drug,” he raps on the first verse.

On the second verse, he continues to grapple with acceptance, feeling shunned by the Black community as well because his skin is so fair, even though white folks view and treat him as a Black man.

“Somebody pinch me/Black man screaming, trying to convince me/I’m not black, So why the white man wanna lynch me?/Damn, my skin fair but life’s not,” he says.

Once you get through the emotional track, which features five poignant, personal verses from Logic, J. Cole, who is also biracial, makes an appearance, lending some sound advice to Logic and baring his soul in a raw, intimate display of lyricism.

“Tell me you could see beyond the smile that I’m puttin’ on/This front that I’m puttin’ up for you/I spill my soul into a microphone/With poems written in blood/In hopes that it’s enough for you/Do you love me yet?, Do you love me yet?/No, okay/I’ll go harder for you/In fact, I rap till I collapse,” Cole spits in the opening bars.

“All I wanted was acceptance,” he continues, “My latest lesson/I’ll never feel your approval until I accept my own.”

He parts with some pertinent words of wisdom: “F— approval from strangers, that s— is dangerous as hell/Find God learn to accept yourself/And I’m gone, Accept Him.”

Listen to the track via Spotify below.

 

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Author: Jacinta Howard

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